Articoli Recenti

Un nuovo incontro con i ghepardi!

DOMENICA 13 OTTOBRE, ORE 15

UNA GIORNATA CON I GHEPARDI

IL GHEPARDO, UN CORRIDORE A RISCHIO. PRESENTAZIONE DI BETTY VON HOENNING, RAPPRESENTANTE EUROPEA DEL CHEETAH CONSERVATION FUND.

FARA’ SEGUITO LA PRESENTAZIONE DEL ROMANZO “UN CUCCIOLO INDIMENTICABILE” DA PARTE DELL’AUTRICE, MATHILDE BONETTI.

Alla fine della manifestazione verranno messi in vendita gadgets e magliette a favore del Centro in Namibia.

banner TV HD

PARCO FAUNISTICO LE CORNELLE – VALBREMBO (BG)

Il Parco Le Cornelle partecipa attivamente al Progetto del CCF a favore dei ghepardiPoster Mathilde


AL Jazeera sul traffico di animali esotici dallo Yemen

Yemen: Arabia’s wildlife supermarket – Yemen: il supermercato di fauna e flora africana
Exotic wildlife is often smuggled from the Horn of Africa through Yemen to rich buyers in the Gulf.
Fauna e flora esotica spesso contrabbandate dal  Corno d’Africa passando per lo Yemen verso i ricchi clienti del Golfo
 and  Last Modified: 13 Aug 2013 13:40
Beit al-Faqih, Yemen – The dealer and prospective buyer were casually introduced to one another, and two small cheetah cubs were brought into the room. Visibly underweight and with dirty yellow fur, they limped and meowed meekly.The animals were weak and slow, and their skin hung loosely from their bones. Two other cubs had perished and their emaciated carcasses lay nearby.

Ali, a dealer of rare animals in Beit al-Faqih, a city in western Yemen, claimed to have had eight cheetah cubs in his possession. Four had recently been sold to a Saudi family, he said on the condition of anonymity. It had only taken an hour in the city’s Friday animal market to find him. Posing as buyers for a European zoo, nobody questioned why two tall, white foreigners were looking to buy African animals in Yemen. None of the livestock traders who descend on the city each week seemed surprised when asked if they had lions, leopards, or cheetahs for sale.

Yemeni traders know that foreigners wandering though their souk are not simply looking for camels or cheap Ethiopian sheep. The city has become a hub for the lucrative trade in wild animals, smuggled across the Red Sea between Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Visitors from the Gulf states looking for exotic animals for private collections and pets have become a common sight in western Yemen.

While the exact numbers are unavailable, the trend seems to have put a dent in the cheetah population across Somalia, whose autonomous Somaliland region – located across the Gulf of Aden from Yemen – is used as a staging ground for the smuggling. In an ironic twist, Yemen, the poorest country in the Arab world, is now allegedly one of the world’s most lucrative conduits for wildlife crime.

Research compiled by the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) suggests that many cubs taken from the wild in Africa die before reaching their final destination in the Arabian Peninsula. The secretive nature of the smuggling industry and the volatility of the Horn of Africa and Yemen mean that few statistics are available on the animal trafficking business between Africa and Arabia.

Patricia Tricorache, CCF’s project director, believes the Gulf’s insatiable demand for wild pets like cheetahs is decimating the species. “The mortality rate for cheetah cubs is a disaster for a population that is already teetering. The species used to thrive across East Africa, all the way across the Gulf and into Central Asia. Now there are as few as 10,000 left, and these are being harvested like a cash crop.”

Over the course of a year, each visit to the western coast of Yemen yielded a little more insight into the trade. Animals are snatched from the bush in Kenya and Ethiopia before being passed on through loose networks of dealers over a period of weeks.

From sparsely populated beaches in Somaliland, the animals are shipped across the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea, and arrive on Yemen’s western coastline.

Yemeni traders often pay only around $200 per cub on the Somali coast, while the final selling price for each cheetah sold in the Gulf ranges from $4,000-7,000. The CCF and the Welthungerlife sanctuary in Somaliland estimate that about 300 cheetah cubs pass through Yemen each year.

The animals often change hands again, between dealers in Yemeni cities like Haradh and Beit al-Faqih near the Bab al-Mandeb peninsula, before heading north along a wide tarmac road that runs towards the country’s northern border. Neighbouring Saudi Arabia’s porous frontier has been turned into a wildlife superhighway.

Little enforcement

Lawlessness in Yemen and the Horn of Africa create a profitable atmosphere for the illegal wildlife trade. Yemen’s government, which faces major challenges from separatists in the north and south and attacks by al-Qaeda-affiliated fighters, struggles to prevent the trade in wild animals. The country’s former environment minister and lifelong conservationist Abdulrahman F al-Eryani is pessimistic about the potential for greater enforcement in the country.

He said apologetically: “Yemen is going through socio-political chaos. It has always had little budget for environmental protection, which makes any expectation of enforcement against animal smuggling unrealistic.”

David Stanton, who runs a foundation to protect Yemeni leopards and has lived in the country for nearly 20 years, is one of the few outsiders to have attempted to scrape the surface of the industry in Yemen.

“The feeling that wildlife crime is not really a crime is almost universal,” Stanton said. “Yemenis involved in the wildlife trade probably know that it is illegal, but I doubt that many of them feel that it is unethical or immoral.”

Yet a recent resolution by the UN’s Economic and Social Council suggests strong links between the illegal shipments of guns, people, drugs and wildlife. Regardless of the perceived morality, demand for exotic pets in Dubai, Jeddah and Doha can fund far more serious crime in the region.

Joe Sheffer/Transterra Media

Research compiled by the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) suggest that 70 percent of cubs taken from the wild die before reaching their final destination

  • image0
  • image1
  • image2
  • image3
  • image4
  • image5
  • image6
  • image7
  • image8
  • image0
  • image1
  • image2
  • image3
  • image4
  • image5
  • image6
  • image7
  • image8
  • image0
  • image1
  • image2
  • image3
  • image4
  • image5
  • image6
  • image7
  • image8

Start Slide Show
7 / 9


Il nostro Gebhard Vince il Premio Disney Conservation Hero

  photo GebsBlastGraphic_zps183a9483.jpg
Meet Gebhardt Nikanor, One of CCF’s Heroes of Conservation

Every day at Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia, we welcome visitors, including school groups from all over Namibia and from around the world. They come to our International Field Research and Education Centre and learn all about the cheetah, its race against extinction, and how they can help.

Gebhardt Nikanor (we call him “Gebs”) as CCF’s Education Officer, travels all over Namibia, bringing CCF’s education programming to school learners throughout the country, teaching Namibia’s next generation about environmental stewardship, and about the cheetah. This week, the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund honored Gebs as one of its 2013 Disney Conservation Heroes,an award that comes with a cash prize that is shared between the winner and his nominating organization.

 photo DonateButtonCMC_zpse01a89a2.jpg

Gebs is a native Namibian, and his work for CCF stands as an example of how your support of CCF makes a difference not only for the cheetah and its ecosystem, but for human communities as well. Gebs has reached over 100,000 Namibian youth over the course of his 12 years as an Educator at CCF. “Returning to these schools where I have developed relationships with the teachers and the learners has provided a strong basis for on-going environmental education. I want each of the learners to have a deep appreciation for all of Namibia’s wildlife species,” he says.

CCF’s education programs at our International Field Research and Education Centre, at our weekend camp facility Camp Lightfoot, and in Namibian schools have reached over 300,000 school learners, instilling in them an appreciation for the cheetah and a desire to protect their wildlife treasures.

 photo DonateButtonCMC_zpse01a89a2.jpg

What inspires me is that Gebs’s dedication is by no means unusual among the CCF staff. Every day here at our facility in Namibia I am proud to work with men and women from Namibia and around the world whose commitment to excellence, and to saving the cheetah, is without equal. Gebs isn’t the first staff member to be recognized as a Disney Conservation Hero — our Senior Ecologist and Education Officer, Matti Nghikembua, received the same honor in 2006.

Knowing I have such a wonderful team of individuals around me to help us win the race to save the cheetah is heartening. But in addition to great people like Gebs and Matti, we need resources. That’s why your generous contribution to the Chewbaaka Memorial Challenge is so important to us every year. We’re in the final weeks of this important campaign, which provides much needed funds for our education programs and other operations in Namibia. And every dollar you give up to $176,000 will be matched by our Challenge Donors.

We’re really proud of Gebs, and pleased to share with you how one of our CCF heroes is being honored by the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund. As part of our global CCF family, your support helps make moments like this possible.

For Cheetahs Everywhere,
LM_Signature
Dr. Laurie Marker

Forward to a Friend 

 photo schoolgroup_zps33be4107.jpgCheetah Conservation Fund’s Educator, Gebhardt Nikanor (far left), has reached thousands of Namibian children and youth to foment an understanding of the importance of wildlife to preserve healthy eco-systems.

 photo CCFEducationCentre_zps10ceb5b4.jpg

Namibian school learners visiting our Education Centre in Otjiwarongo, Namibia. You can watch the same video our visitors in Namibia see here.

 photo ff6a5ee9-856a-4ace-984e-43da90a0814a_zps8fa522cf.jpg

A participant from a recent National Geographic Student Expeditions trip learns from the staff at CCF’s Veterinary Clinic.

CCF Logo
P.O. Box 2496, Alexandria, VA 22301
866-909-3399
 http://www.cheetah.org  info@cheetah.org


Charity Navigator

 

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and our blog!

  Photobucket Photobucket

This message was sent from Cheetah Conservation Fund to liz@cheetah.org. It was sent from:

PO Box 2496
Alexandria, VA 22301

Click here to modify/update your subscription.

Bernard Data Solutions

Conferenza il 18 agosto 2013

Conferenza il 18 agosto 2013